Is Schizophrenia Genetic?
Is Schizophrenia Genetic?
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Is Schizophrenia Genetic?

A question often asked is; Is Schizophrenia Genetic? These questions come from an array of people. This isn’t an easy question to answer because answers can vary. Just because you are related to someone with schizophrenia does not mean you have it also. But, studies have shown high enough amounts of people having schizophrenia also having a family member with it that genetic schizophrenia has to be ruled as true. Statistics show:

“People with a family history of schizophrenia are at much higher risk of developing the condition. Approximately 1% of the general population in the US have schizophrenia, but it occurs in around 10% of individuals who have a first-degree relative with the disorder.”

If you or a relative has been diagnosed with schizophrenia disorder than it is important for you to read this information. Another important step you should take is getting a genetic consultation. This is highly recommended and can help you plan better for the future.

 

Heredity and the Genetics of Schizophrenia

On this website you can find an in-depth look at genetic schizophrenia. According to Dr. Daniel Weinberger there are (roughly) 10 specific genes that are linked to schizophrenia. These 10 genes can increase your susceptibility greatly! Sadly, these genes aren’t completely uncommon, they are genes that many people possess. The catch is that the more of these genes you have the higher your risk of having schizophrenia becomes. It’s not just the genes themselves but rather the genes “mixed” with other genes that increases your risk of having schizophrenia. The chart below summarizes the risks of developing schizophrenia from genetics.

Schizophrenia Made Up of Eight Specific Genetic Disorders

This site is all about a new study done in 2014 that claims there are 8 distinct genes that are linked to schizophrenia. This study might, according to one of the researchers Dr. C. Robert Cloninger, “pave the way for better diagnosis and treatment strategies for schizophrenia”. The way they decided to research was different from past studies because they wanted to look at how genes work together instead of just looking at a gene itself. By comparing the DNA of both people with and without schizophrenia they were able to find which genetic variations linked directly to schizophrenia.

 Molecular Genetic Studies of Schizophrenia

Over the years there have been lots of studies involving the “search” for the truth behind genetic schizophrenia. There have been many ideas; some linking specific genes to schizophrenia, others linking clusters, etc. Not every study brought back correct feedback due to a lack of proper testing steps. It wasn’t until these errors were fixed that proper results started to come back. The chart below represents feedback from over seven different studies. It shows the risk of having schizophrenia with a relative that has schizophrenia is about 4.8%.

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Genetics have been found in many cases as to being the cause behind schizophrenia. Studies have proven that different types of genes and how they work together can increase the risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia. Studies have also shown that being related to someone that has schizophrenia can increase your chances of also being diagnosed greatly. It is important to know your families medical history in order to get treated earlier than later.

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